The two uninhabited islands we see from our water front looking towards Bald Head Island are Striking Island and Battery Island. Both small islands are part of the 19 Audubon bird sanctuary islands located along the NC coast. They are not recreation areas for people. Some boaters and kayakers may think it is acceptable to land on the islands. This is not the case. People should not land on the islands and walk around.

Coastal birds need particular habitat to nest. These sanctuary islands provide that habitat and specifically prohibit human use so the habitat is intact and safe for birds. Birds that nest on sanctuary islands include White Ibis, Brown Pelican, Oystercatcher and Terns.

Audubon biologist and sanctuary manager Lindsay Addison, advises you see people on the islands, to call NC WRC law enforcement: 800-662-7137. As the island’s manager and bird monitor, Lindsay can affirm that there is no place people can land, even below mean high water, where they would not be disturbing nesting birds.

If citizens have questions or concerns about wildlife it is also ok to contact our Animal Welfare Officer Kate Marshall at City Hall 910-457-7900 or 910 477-1486. She is very educated about wildlife and is responsible for all animal welfare in Southport.

Virtual Field Trip details:

· What: Virtual Field Trip: Spring Bird Celebration

· When: 9-10:30 a.m., Saturday, April 18

· Who: Audubon North Carolina and you!

· Where: Facebook Live, at facebook.com/audubonnc.

Mountains: Director of Conservation Curtis Smalling shows us singing songbirds in wetlands near Boone.

Piedmont: Director of Engagement Kim Brand gives us an up-close look at the birds nesting in her backyard, from Carolina Wrens to Barred Owls.

Coast: Coastal Biologist Lindsay Addison takes us on a tour of nesting pelicans in the Cape Fear River near Wilmington.

Is my pet at risk from the COVID-19 coronavirus, or will my pet infect me?

The CDC says that, at present, there is no evidence to suggest that dogs or cats will become a source of infection of COVID-19.

Your pet is NOT A RISK to you and is NOT AT RISK from the virus.

 On 2.28.20 it was reported that Hong Kong authorities quarantined a dog after samples from the dog’s nasal cavity and mouth tested “weak positive” for the virus. The dog’s owner had tested positive for COVID-19. Currently, the dog is not showing signs of illness and will be tested again. It is unknown if the detected presence of the virus is due to infection or environmental contamination. We will continue to provide updates.

It’s important to remember that viruses can sometimes infect a species but not cause illness in that species, nor become transmissible to others.

As far as realistic risk factors—if, for instance, your dog is usually at home and doesn’t contact other dogs or people and no one in your household has the COVID-19 coronavirus, the odds that your pet would become sick—IF the virus is determined to be transmittable to animals—are highly unlikely.

It is still recommended that people who are sick with COVID-19 avoid contact with animals out of an abundance of caution.

It is always a good idea to wash your hands with soap and water after contact with pets to help avoid transmission of more common illness-causing agents, such as E. coli and Salmonella.

To protect your pet from respiratory diseases, vaccinate your pet for Bordetella, parainfluenza and canine influenza, which are the most common vaccine-preventable respiratory diseases in pets.

Keep your pets fully immunized at all times. Your veterinarian can help you determine which vaccines your pet should have, based on its risk factors.